Return to SE Firemap
return
return to main site

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
Personal tools
You are here: Home Information Materials Facts Sheets Golden-Winged Warbler Great Lakes/Canada Fact Sheets Best Management Practices for Golden-winged Warbler Habitat on Abandoned Farmlands in the Great Lakes

Best Management Practices for Golden-winged Warbler Habitat on Abandoned Farmlands in the Great Lakes

Since the early 20th century, abandoned farmland has become an important component of the Great Lakes landscape. When crop and pasture lands become inactive, they begin succeeding into their pre-agricultural state, which is often deciduous forest. The span of time from field to forest takes decades, during which there is a period of years where the ratio of herbaceous vegetation, shrubs, and young trees on a given site can potentially create habitat for breeding Golden-winged Warblers (Figure 1). Without active management, this is a temporary condition that typically persists for less than a decade. Throughout the region there is an excellent opportunity, especially on private lands, to create habitat for Golden-winged Warbler on abandoned farmlands. Perhaps the best opportunities exist on poorly drained soils that are too wet for pasture or crops.
Best Management Practices for Golden-winged Warbler Habitat on Abandoned Farmlands in the Great Lakes

Download File:

GWWA-Habitat-GreatLakes-abandoned-farms-130808_lo-res.pdf — PDF document, 228 kB (233,837 bytes)